WHAT YOU WILL NEED

Preparation time

ADULT CATS

Something good to know

BRINING A KITTEN/CAT HOME:

First days at new home

FEEDING

Guidelines to help

KIDS AND CATS:

Getting the best experience 

CLAWS CARE

Taking care of cats feet

KITTENS

Important notes

WHAT YOU WILL NEED:
 

  • Cat litter box, litter and litter scoop (I use Pine pellets and a closed litter box)

  • Food Dish

  • Water dish pet fountain or dispenser (any brand any kind as to the water I use the tap water that has been kept overnight or the filtered water)

  • Scratching post or platform (best buys are found on ebay under cat trees or in WALMART & TJMaxx)

  • Cat Food (please see the feeding guide below)

  • Cat Toys, laser light,  toys with feathers etc..  paper box with holes..  they love everything! 

  • Catnip/wheatgrass garden (optional)

  • Travel Carrier – If traveling to pick up your kitten a car travel carrier works great. We can provide one for you as well upon a request. 

     

BRINING A KITTEN/CAT HOME:
 

Cats have a well-earned reputation for being curious, independent and sensitive. They’re so sensitive to their surrounding, in fact, that they require a great deal of time to adjust to the new environment. You can do a lot to help your cat companion feel secure in his/her new home.

Keep the cat in his/her carrier until you’ve brought the carrier into a quiet room where the cat can be confined for the next day or two. I have kept your kitten in the carrier at various times to make it feel secure. This will be your cat’s “safe” room. Have a litter box prepared in that room, as well as a scratching post and bowls of food and water. If you want your cat to feel especially at home, purchase a cozy cat bed ahead of time and place it in the safe room. Be sure that all the windows and doors in your house are closed, that loose electrical cords have been secured, and that any spaces behind appliances or large pieces of furniture are blocked off.

Once in the safe room, open the carrier and let the cat come out in her own time. Keep the noise and bustle in your house to a minimum while the cat orients herself. Our kittens have grown living in a family so they tend to adjust to new things quite readily. But, stay quietly in the room while the kitten explores, offering attention and gentle stroking if she seems to want it. If there are no other animals in the house it’s all right to leave the door to the cat’s room open slightly when you leave, but don’t be surprised if she/he stays in one spot for a few days.

 


HIDING:

 

Hiding is normal. Some cats spend their first few days, weeks or even months (which is very rare and read in books only)))) in a new home in hiding, usually under beds or in closets. Hiding is how some cats adjust to their new environments, and it does not mean that the cat is unaffectionate, unsocial or sick. Few cats repress their curiosity enough to stay under a bed for more than a few days, but if your cat requires more hiding time, make sure she’s getting food and water and if getting out at some point to use the litter box. DO NOT attempt to forcibly pull or drive a cat out from a hiding place, as this will only intensify her fears and make her adjustment harder.
 

Introducing your new cat to other pets:

If you have other cats or a dog living with you it’s best to keep the new cat confined in the “safe” room for a few days while your established pets get used to her smell, and vice versa. When you bring cats together for the first time it would be best to choose a day when you can be around the house, encouraging friendly behavior with praise and affection. NEVER FORCE THE ANIMALS TOWARD EACH OTHER!
 

A dog meeting a new cat should always be leashed. Supervise the encounter, and watch your dog for signs of aggressive behavior towards the cat. Curiosity is normal, but a dog who lunges at a cat is not safe to be off-leash with the feline. If your dog gets on well with the cat but the cat shows you that she’s feeling extremely threatened during this experience, let her retreat to her “safe” room until she’s willing to try again.

 

 

KIDS AND CATS:

There is no reason why young children and cats cannot be the best friends, as long as your kids understand some simple facts about cat behavior. Kids and Cats are the perfect match!

Keep in mind these important reminders:

  • Cats DO NOT like to be squeezed, picked up by the neck or have their tails pulled. Cats are sensitive to loud noises and sudden movements, and will feel threatened if they’re chased or lunged at.

  • Cats DO NOT like to be disturbed while they are eating.

  • Most cats DO like to be scratched gently under their chins or behind their ears and enjoy having their coats brushed.

  • Making the adjustment from my home to yours physically is important, but you must also keep up on their health plan. I have given wormer starting at two weeks of age and their first vaccinations following the recommendations from the American Association of Feline Practitioners, a veterinary specialty group, on cat vaccines.

 

 

KITTENS:

  • Vaccinations are starting at 8 weeks of age a booster is given 4 weeks from the date of the first vaccination then possible a month later depending on your vet’s recommendations.

  • Use FVRCP and rabies(only killed vaccines)

  • Rabies can be given after 16 weeks of age, but most recent recommendations are 6 months and up.

  • I deworm prior to vaccinate a kitten.

  • Medicine is given yearly for tapeworm or more often if fleas have been a problem.

  • Frontline, Advantage or Revolution, or BioCare and Skeeter beater soap is used monthly to help with fleas if a problem in your area.

  • Good breeding lines also  insure the health and quality of our cats and kittens.

  • Rabies vaccination is strongly recommended by the state law. 

  • Deworming schedule for young kittens and tick and flea treatments are necessary too. 

  • Our cats are tested Negative for FIV, FeLV, Cardiomyopathy and Heartwarm.

 

ADULT CATS:

After the initial kitten vaccines or first adult series, rotate the FVRCP and rabies on three year cycles. Your cat gets it’s yearly physical and we minimize vaccine reactions.

I, personally, bathe our cats as needed with a aloe and oatmeal shampoo or skeeter beater soap (just as an additional flea and tick prevention). This helps keep the hair shedding down. Though cats do not enjoy them, baths are recommended  to limit the smell, dirt and loose hair.Taking your pet to the groomers is good option as well too, for their SPA (ear cleaning, nail trim, teeth cleaning). The frequency is up to you.

We brush our cats with a bristle brush as often as needed to remove loose hair and dirt.
The felines eyes need to be cleaned when needed with eye solution to remove tear stains (I prefer to use filtered water with colloidal silver added to it).

We also recommend your pet to have their teeth cleaned by a veterinarian once per year.

This all may sound a bit too much but generally a feline does not require much from you, just love and a little bit of care on a daily basis.

A well ventilated room with adequate temperature, non-toxic environment in the home, fresh water, and other sanitary conditions keep pets healthy.

TAKING CARE OF CAT's CLAWS

 


Cats need healthy feet to scratch, climb and achieve their famed acrobatic landings. That’s why it’s important to regularly examine and clean your cat’s paws and make sure they’re wound-free.

Trimming a cat's claws every few weeks is an important part of maintaining your pet's health. Not only does a quick trim protect you, your pet and your family, it can also save your sofa, curtains and other furniture. Nail-trimming is also a fast, effective and HEALTHY alternative to declawing (which involves surgical amputation and can cause behavioral and health issues and absolute no-no for me as a breeder).

Trimming a cat's claws is really easy and all it takes is some patience and a bit of practice to sharpen your skills. 

 

There are plenty of tools available to trim a cat's claws; use the one that works best for you and your pet.

Some people prefer a special pair of scissors modified to hold a cat's claw in place, others prefer human nail clippers and still others choose pliers-like clippers or those with a sliding "guillotine" blade. Whatever your tool, be sure the blade remains sharp; the blunt pressure from dull blades may hurt an animal and cause a nail to split or bleed. Keep something on hand to stop bleeding, such as styptic powder, cornstarch or a dry bar of soap (to rub the bleeding nail across).

Cat nail caps or cat nail silicone covers can also become a great solution to protect you and the house from scratches.

 

FEEDING

THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM OF BRITISH SHORTHAIR IS MORE SENSITIVE THAN of OTHER CATS! PLEASE FOLLOW the guidelines provided below 
 

To keep your cat healthy carbs should be avoided in a diet (cats are predators). 
Grain-free diet is the number one rule, though some grain containing dry food show good results and can be used as an occasional feast, but not the #1 diet. 

Although commercially processed cat food is convenient, it does not provide all the proper diet essentials and contain lots of additions that can be harmful for the sensitive digestive system of British Shorthair cats.
We recommend feeding adult cats twice a day (adult 12M+ animals).

 

Having access to food all day long keeps cat's system alkaline that lowers their immunity which may easily cause Feline Urogical Syndrome (FUS).

THOUGH Kittens, pregnant, lactating, and younger cats should be fed more often.
As cats are carnivores, their stomach and digestive system is designed to consume RAW food and animal protein .

Raw food supplies maximum the nutrients needed for all life stages, so we feed our kitties natural meat  (chicken, beef, lamb, rabbit, pigeon, turkey, etc) and seafood  (wild caught). Farm raised seafood is bad for cats. The side effects include sickness and weakness. 
We strongly advise to feed pre-frozen products (kept in a freezer for at least 2 days) and strongly suggest NOT TO feed cats raw pork and all kinds of fat containing products.

Cats also enjoy eating egg yolks, liver, gizzards, hearts, kidneys and other internal parts of animals that make an excellent feeding choice for daily meals or snacks.In addition, dairy with live bacteria such as yogurt, cultured milk, sour cream, etc. are offered as well. PLEASE see the example of the MENU below.

I prefer natural food + vitamins (Taurine is a must) that I make
(kittens have an access to the dry food always but show no or little interest when fed natural food)
please note all the dry food and commercial food is removed when the homemade mix is offered an hour before and an hour after.


The recipe I make:
 
7 lbs meat no bone (ground beef 93 lean /7% fat, gizzards)

7 lbs meat with bone (chicken, turkey thighs most asian stores have a commercial grade grinder and can grind you the chicken upon a request)
3.5 lbs chicken hearts
2 lbs chicken liver
6-9 eggs
6 cans sardines (don't add to kittens and pregnant/lactating female's mix)


Smaller batch:

 

1 lbs meat no bone (ground beef 93 lean /7% fat, gizzards)

1 lbs meat with bone (chicken, turkey thighs most asian stores have a commercial grade grinder and can grind you the chicken upon a request)
8 oz chicken hearts
3.5 oz chicken liver
1 egg
3/4 cans sardines (don't add to kittens and pregnant/lactating female's mix)

grind and mix keep in freezer for 2 days before feeding make small daily portions and thaw 1 portion every day


 


 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

1 -1.5 months

feeding 6-8 times a day small portions

  • KMR 2nd STEP Weaning food (cat’s formula)

  • ORIJEN or BLUE or PEAK kittens dry food pre-soaked in water or formula

  • cooked veal or beef fat-free part (sliced into tiny pieces or blended with broth)

  • farmer’s cheese

  • cooked chicken breast blended with broth

100% WET FOOD

2 months

feeding 6-8 times a day small portions

  • KMR 2nd STEP Weaning food (cat’s formula)

  • natural homemade mix

  • ORIJEN (the brand we feed at the moment) or BLUE or PEAK kittens dry food pre-soaked in water or formula

  • cooked veal or beef fat free part

  • sliced into tiny peaces or blended with broth

  • farmer’s cheese (low fat)

  • low fat yoghurt (no additions)

  • cooked chicken breast blended with broth 

100% WET FOOD

3 months

feeding 6 times a day

  • KMR 2nd STEP Weaning food (cat’s formula)

  • natural homemade mix

  • ORIJEN or BLUE or PEAK kittens dry food pre-soaked in water or formula

  • cooked beef fat-free part sliced into tiny pieces or blended with broth 

  • farmer’s cheese (low fat)

  • low fat yoghurt (no additions)

  • cooked chicken breast blended with broth 

  • egg yolk

  • cooked wild caught fish

  • infants meat food

  • liver, stomachs, harts etc cooked 

  • steamed vegetables

90% wet food

10% dry food

4-6 months

feeding 5-6 times a day

reducing to 4 closer to 6 months milestone

  • natural homemade mix

  • liver, stomachs, harts etc cooked OR frozen for  at least 2 days 

  • cheese

  • KMR 2nd STEP Weaning food (cat’s formula)

  • or milk (preferably organic - can be mixed with yolk)

  • ORIJEN or BLUE or PEAK kittens dry food pre-soaked in water or formula

  • cooked veal or beef fat-free part (sliced into tiny pieces or blended with broth)

  • farmer’s cheese

  • low fat yoghurt (no additions)

  • cooked chicken breast blended with broth 

  • egg yolk

  • infants meat food

  • meet byproducts (liver, stomachs, harts etc) cooked 

  • steamed vegetables

70-80% wet food

20-30% dry food

6-10 months

feeding 3-4 times a day

  • NO MILK allowed after reaching 6 mo

  • natural homemade mix

  • liver, stomachs, harts etc cooked OR frozen for  at least 2 days

  • cheese (occasionally as a treat)

  • ORIJEN or BLUE or PEAK kittens dry food

  • cooked veal or beef fat-free part

  • cat’s canned food for the proper age sliced into tiny peaces or blended with broth 

  • farmer’s cheese (low fat)

  • low fat yoghurt (no additions)

  • cooked chicken breast blended with broth 

  • egg yolk

  • infants meat food

  • meet byproducts (liver, stomachs, harts etc) cooked 

  • dry cat’s food ( grain fee kitten)

  • steamed vegetables

60-70% wet

30-40% dry

10-12 months

feeding 2-3 times a day

  • natural homemade mix

  • liver, stomachs, harts etc cooked OR frozen for  at least 2 days          (thaw and let it reach the room temperature prior to giving to the cat)

  • cheese

  • ORIJEN or BLUE or PEAK kittens dry food 

  • cooked veal or beef fat free part

  • cat’s canned food for the proper age

  • sliced into tiny peaces or blended with broth

  • farmer’s cheese 

  • low fat yoghurt (no additions)

  • cooked chicken breast blended with broth 

  • egg yolk

  • infants meat food

  • meet byproducts (liver, stomachs, harts etc) cooked or raw pre-frozen for 2 days

  • dry cat’s food ( grain fee kitten)

  • vegetables

50-60% wet food
50-40% dry food

12 + months

feeding 2 times a day

  • natural homemade mix

  • liver, stomachs, harts etc cooked OR frozen for  at least 2 days

  • cheese

  • ORIJEN or BLUE or PEAK kittens dry food 

  • cooked veal or beef fat free part sliced into tiny pieces or blended with broth 

  • cat’s canned food for the proper age (reading labels is helpful)

  • farmer’s cheese 

  • low fat yoghurt (no additions)

  • cooked chicken breast blended with broth 

  • egg yolk

  • infants meat food

  • meet byproducts (liver, stomachs, harts etc) cooked or raw pre-frozen for 2 days

  • dry cat’s food ( grain fee adult)

  • vegetables

at least 30% of wet food IS recommended

LINKS TO THE GREAT STUFF I RECOMMEND

TOP 1

Many of you ask where do I cook and blend all the momemdae cat food and despite all the great equipment i have this is a true find I am extremely happy with for cooking my meals as well as my cats meals. it is connected to wifi, has 56000 and growing recipes database, has a sous vide mode that I love and a thickener for a perfect pate THE BEST THING I HAVE at my kitchen.

I make the food for my family and make the raw mix and pate for my cats. It is not my job to sell them but I have signed up because after trying it I WANT EVERYONE TO HAVE IT!

Please contact me if you want it with a beautiful $150 cost thermal serving bowl as a gift and a complimentary free shipping

otherwise  click HERE to order

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TOP 2

COLLOIDAL SLVER I LOVE AND PERSONALLY TAKE CAN BE FOUND HERE CLICK

TOP 3

VETCO clinic (at PetCo store) for vaccines and routine check-ups

Email us  IDcatterycom@gmail.com 

Seattle, Washington, USA

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